Monday, May 2, 2011

Muslim Mob In Pakistan Attacks Seminary, Forces Thousands of Christians to Flee Their Homes

There is no free speech in the Muslim country of Pakistan. If someone defames Islam by mocking the founder of Islam, Muhammad or by defacing a Quran that person will be punished by imprisonment or death. Unfortunately, Pakistani muslims use these blasphemy laws as an excuse to persecute my Pakistani brothers and sisters in Christ.

Washington, D.C. (May 2, 2011)–International Christian Concern (ICC) has learned that on April 30, a Muslim mob attacked a Presbyterian Seminary in Gujranwala, Pakistan after falsely accusing Christians of desecrating the Qur’an. At least 3000 Christians have fled the area fearing for their lives.
The mob accused Pastor Eric Isaac, former pastor of a Presbyterian church, of burning the Qur’an. He has been arrested. he police were able to prevent the mob, estimated at 4000, from causing further damage to Christian homes and churches in the area. Several police were injured by the violent mob. The police arrested at least 135 of the rioters.

This is not the first time that Muslims have accused Christians in Gujranwala of desecrating the Qur’an. Mushtaq Gill and his son Farrukh Gill were accused of the same issue on April 15. Though the police were convinced that the allegation was false, they arrested Mushtaq and Farrukh because of intense pressure from Muslim mobs. The police released them the next day but rearrested them after pressure from Muslim radicals. According to Pakistan’s blasphemy law, desecration of the Qur’an is a crime punishable by life imprisonment. Desecrating the name of the Islam’s Prophet, Muhammad, is punishable by death.

Once again Muslim radicals are inciting violence against Christians based on a false accusation of blasphemy. We urge the Pakistani officials to investigate this latest incident of attack and bring those responsible to justice. It is high time for Pakistan to reform its blasphemy laws that cause so much violence against Christian minorities in the country,” said Jonathan Racho, ICC’s Regional Manager for South Asia. (Source)

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